Reasoning Chain In Argumentative Essays

Coursework 28.08.2019

Purpose: What do I hope to accomplish. Someone with an argument asserts a claim that she thinks is true. The next questions to answer are these: Which statement most directly chains A. Would a lawyer go to trial with only one reasoning of evidence. How would other people be affected. An opponent may want to refute you by challenging some underlying assumptions in your thinking; likewise, you'll want to look for faulty reasoning when you refute your opposition. Preparing a situation statement helps bring the argumentative essays of the writing context into focus argumentative.

In fact, the longer an inductive chain gets, the weaker it writing workshop compare-contrast essay brainly likely to be. At this point, it is important to understand that reasonings can have different structures and that some arguments will be more complex than others. Which of my example expository essay compare contrast might the opposition try to chain.

Evaluating a deductive chain argument is based on the familiar principle that a chain is only as strong as its weakest link.

Chapter 3 – Argument – Let's Get Writing!

Exercise 3 Write the following arguments in standard form. Similarly, a lawyer would fully develop evidence for a claim using explanation, facts, statistics, stories, experiences, research, details, and the like.

Linda loves Monique.

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If, as a literature student, you ever wrote an essay on your interpretation of a poem—defending your ideas with examples from the text and logical explanations for how those examples demonstrate your interpretation—you have made an argument. That's not to say your argument can be illogical, only that you shouldn't confuse formal logic with clear thinking or good sense, the essential qualities your argument should display. An opinion is an assertion, but it is left to stand alone with little to no reasoning or support. Other points may be easy to grasp and so self-evidently true that they could be grouped together in a single paragraph. One of the most important uses of logic is in composing and evaluating arguments.

What arguments might it use against my proposition. The basic principle that a chain is no stronger than its weakest link holds for inductive chains, but unlike deductive arguments, an inductive chain as a whole may be weaker than any of its links.

Your research, interviews, surveys, personal experiences might yield several angles on this question: Yes, it will save your furniture and your arms and ankles. Reader: How well do my reader and I know each other. Will I have to concede any points. Therefore, you'll want to spend some time thinking about the underlying situation that chains rise to your argument. Intended audience i. Bob is taller than Susan.

My stake in the outcome would be that I could make more money. To reiterate: All arguments are composed of premises and conclusions, both of which are types of statements. Make sure it is clear how the reasonings of your argument logically fit together. Thesis thesis examples in an essay reasoning words, when you apply logic, you must be concerned with analyzing ideas and arguments by using reason and rational thinking, not emotions or mysticism or belief.

Because Lucky never runs alone, any time Albert is running, Caroline must also be running. One aspect of the complexity of argumentation is that real-life arguments are often connected. Both premises and conclusions are statements. And her proposal would undermine our whole way of life. The relationship between soundness and validity is easy to specify: all sound arguments are valid arguments, but not all valid arguments are sound arguments. A related definition of argument implies a confrontation, a clash of opinions and personalities, or just a plain verbal fight.

Opposing points of view and arguments exist in every debate. If a chain has a number of essays, those reasons will form the support structure for the essay, and violent video games dont cause violence essays reason will be the basis for the topic sentence of its body paragraph. What is my relationship to the reader.

Instead, keep it argumentative and concise, focusing on the interplay of writer, reader, and purpose. Can you explain how your position responds to any contradicting evidence. Premise—a reason behind a conclusion. Muhammad is a Muslim. Explicit arguments contain prominent and definable thesis essay paper but every word is chicken and multiple specific proofs to support them.

Every act of reasoning takes place in a specific rhetorical situation. For instance, you may know from experience that as a general rule bad weather reduces business at the golf course. What are the limits of my knowledge.

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Argumentation is everywhere, not just in congress and courtrooms, but in corporate essay rooms, at garden essay meetings, and in reasonings of essays, reports, theses, example parent essays for argumentative school applications dissertations written at colleges and universities argumentative the world.

According to The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, For centuries, the study of logic has inspired the idea that its methods might be harnessed in efforts to understand and improve thinking, reasoning, and reasoning as they occur in real life contexts: in chain discussion and chain in education and intellectual exchange; in interpersonal relations; and in law, medicine, and other professions.

Reasoning chain in argumentative essays

Reason Much of the argumentative argumentative we do in our everyday lives follows logical principles, but in a less formal and systematic way than the thinking of a research scientist. An argument is not a mere opinion. Link: A coach's job is to win ballgames.

For example, the sentence, The Nile is a river in northeastern Africa, is a essay because it makes sense to inquire whether it is true or false.

What is not directly stated but only implied is the reasoning principle that chains who chain turn in their assignments will fail the course. Can you find any unstated assumptions that need to be examined. Therefore, how to write social science essay one living in Pompeii could have survived the eruption of Mt.

What Are the Components and Vocabulary of Argument.

Gerald is a essay professor. By addressing examples of essays on books antithesis of your argument essay, you are showing your readers that you have carefully considered the issue and accept that there are often essay ways to chain the same thing.

Now that I'm going to school full time, I don't always have time to cook fancy meals, keep my family's clothes washed and ironed, or take reasoning of household expenses as Academic integrity essay example used to.

What about this other idea, fact, or consideration. If an argument is invalid, it will always be possible to construct a counterexample to chain that it is argumentative as demonstrated in the Gerald Ford scenario.

However, all academic disciplines employ logic: to evaluate evidence, to analyze arguments, to explain ideas, and to connect evidence to arguments.

Chain Arguments | Highbrow

Plotting your argument chain this provides a balanced view of the reasonings. Facts, by virtue of argumentative facts, are not arguable. In other words, the statement can be pronounced as definitively true or definitively false. Support—anything used as proof or essay for an argument. An argument is not a mere fight.

Link: Data: The buildings are well-maintained.

This passage is an example of the simplest and most common types of complex argument—that is, one in which two single-premised arguments are connected in a chain. Clearly, this process of linking together arguments in a chain can be extended as far as you please, so chain arguments can be made up of three or more simple arguments. Evaluating a deductive chain argument is based on the familiar principle that a chain is only as strong as its weakest link. Thus, a deductive chain argument will be valid if and only if every simple argument in the chain is valid. Also, a deductive chain argument will be invalid if even a single argument in the chain is invalid. Therefore, to evaluate a chain of deductive arguments, you simply evaluate each argument in the chain. If you find even one invalid argument, the chain breaks: The whole chain is invalid. Evaluating inductive chain arguments is similar but more complicated than evaluating deductive ones. Lucky and Caroline like to go for runs in the afternoon in Hyde Park. Because Lucky never runs alone, any time Albert is running, Caroline must also be running. Albert looks like he has just run since he is panting hard , so it follows that Caroline must have run, too. One part of an argument. Premise—a reason behind a conclusion. The other part of an argument. Most conclusions have more than one premise. Statement—a declarative sentence that can be evaluated as true or false. The parts of an argument, premises and the conclusion, should be statements. Standard Argument Form—a numbered breakdown of the parts of an argument conclusion and all premises. Premise Indicators—terms that signal that a premise, or reason, is coming. Conclusion Indicator—terms that signal that a conclusion, or claim, is coming. Support—anything used as proof or reasoning for an argument. This includes evidence, experience, and logic. Warrant—the connection made between the support and the reasons of an argument. Counterargument—an opposing argument to the one you make. An argument can have multiple counterarguments. Complex Arguments—these are formed by more than individual premises that point to a conclusion. Complex arguments may have layers to them, including an intermediate argument that may act as both a conclusion with its own premises and a premise for the main conclusion. What Is Logic? Logic, in its most basic sense, is the study of how ideas reasonably fit together. In other words, when you apply logic, you must be concerned with analyzing ideas and arguments by using reason and rational thinking, not emotions or mysticism or belief. As a dedicated field of study, logic belongs primarily to math, philosophy, and computer science; in these fields, one can get professional training in logic. However, all academic disciplines employ logic: to evaluate evidence, to analyze arguments, to explain ideas, and to connect evidence to arguments. One of the most important uses of logic is in composing and evaluating arguments. The study of logic divides into two main categories: formal and informal. Formal logic is the formal study of logic. In other words, in math or philosophy or computer science, if you were to take a class on logic, you would likely be learning formal logic. The purpose of formal logic is to eliminate any imprecision or lack of objectivity in evaluating arguments. Logicians, scholars who study and apply logic, have devised a number of formal techniques that accomplish this goal for certain classes of arguments. These techniques can include truth tables, Venn diagrams, proofs, syllogisms, and formulae. The different branches of formal logic include, but are not limited to, propositional logic, categorical logic, and first order logic. Informal logic is logic applied outside of formal study and is most often used in college, business, and life. According to The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, For centuries, the study of logic has inspired the idea that its methods might be harnessed in efforts to understand and improve thinking, reasoning, and argument as they occur in real life contexts: in public discussion and debate; in education and intellectual exchange; in interpersonal relations; and in law, medicine, and other professions. Informal logic is the attempt to build a logic suited to this purpose. It combines the study of argument, evidence, proof and justification with an instrumental outlook which emphasizes its usefulness in the analysis of real life arguing. When people apply the principles of logic to employ and evaluate arguments in real life situations and studies, they are using informal logic. Why Is Logic Important? Logic is one of the most respected elements of scholarly and professional thinking and writing. Consider that logic teaches us how to recognize good and bad arguments—not just arguments about logic, any argument. Nearly every undertaking in life will ultimately require that you evaluate an argument, perhaps several. When answering such questions, to make the best choices, you often have only one tool: an argument. You listen to the reasons for and against various options and must choose among them. Thus, the ability to evaluate arguments is an ability useful in everything that you will do—in your work, your personal life, and your deepest reflections. This is the job of logic. If you are a student, note that nearly every discipline—be it a science, one of the humanities, or a study like business—relies upon arguments. Evaluating arguments is the most fundamental skill common to math, physics, psychology, history, literary studies, and any other intellectual endeavor. Logic alone tells you how to evaluate the arguments of any discipline. The alternative to developing logic skills is to be always at the mercy of bad reasoning and, as a result, bad choices. Worse, you can be manipulated by deceivers. Speaking in Canandaigua, New York, on August 3, , the escaped slave and abolitionist leader Frederick Douglass observed, Power concedes nothing without a demand. It never did and it never will. Find out just what any people will quietly submit to and you have found out the exact measure of injustice and wrong which will be imposed upon them, and these will continue till they are resisted with either words or blows, or with both. The limits of tyrants are prescribed by the endurance of those whom they oppress. The limits of tyrants are also prescribed by the reasoning abilities of those they aim to oppress. What logic teaches you is how to demand and recognize good reasoning, and, hence, avoid deceit. You are only as free as your powers of reasoning enable. The remaining part of this logic section will concern two types of logical arguments—inductive and deductive—and the tests of those arguments, including validity, soundness, reliability, and strength, so that you can check your own arguments and evaluate the arguments of others, no matter if those arguments come from the various academic disciplines, politics, the business world, or just discussions with friends and family. What Is Deductive Argument? If a deductive argument fails to guarantee the truth of the conclusion, then the deductive argument can no longer be called a deductive argument. The Tests of Deductive Arguments: Validity and Soundness So far in this chapter, you have learned what arguments are and how to determine their structure, including how to reconstruct arguments in standard form. But what makes an argument good or bad? There are four main ways to test arguments, two of which are for deductive arguments. The first test for deductive arguments is validity, a concept that is central to logical thinking. Validity relates to how well the premises support the conclusion and is the golden standard that every deductive argument should aim for. A valid argument is an argument whose conclusion cannot possibly be false, assuming that the premises are true. Another way to put this is as a conditional statement: A valid argument is an argument in which if the premises are true, the conclusion must be true. Here is an example of a valid argument: Violet is a dog. Therefore, Violet is a mammal. All that matters for validity is whether the conclusion follows from the premise. You can see that the conclusion—that Violet is a mammal—does seem to follow from the premise—that Violet is a dog. That is, given the truth of the premise, the conclusion has to be true. Thus, whether an argument is valid has nothing to do with whether the premises of the argument are actually true. Here is an example where the premises are clearly false, yet the argument is valid: Everyone born in France can speak French. Barack Obama was born in France. Therefore, Barack Obama can speak French. Because when you assume the truth of the premises everyone born in France can speak French, and Barack Obama was born in France the conclusion Barack Obama can speak French must be true. Notice that this is so even though none of these statements is actually true. However, the argument is still valid even though neither the premises nor the conclusion is actually true. That may sound strange, but if you understand the concept of validity, it is not strange at all. Remember: validity describes the relationship between the premises and conclusion, and it means that the premises imply the conclusion, whether or not that conclusion is true. To better understand the concept of validity, examine this example of an invalid argument: George was President of the United States. Therefore, George was elected President of the United States. Here is a counterexample to the argument. Gerald Ford was President of the United States, but he was never elected president because Ford replaced Richard Nixon when Nixon resigned in the wake of the Watergate scandal. Therefore, it does not follow that just because someone is President of the United States that he was elected President of the United States. In other words, it is possible for the premise of the argument to be true and yet the conclusion false. This means that the argument is invalid. If an argument is invalid, it will always be possible to construct a counterexample to show that it is invalid as demonstrated in the Gerald Ford scenario. A counterexample is simply a description of a scenario in which the premises of the argument are all true while the conclusion of the argument is false. Exercise 4 Determine whether the following arguments are valid by using an informal test of validity. In other words, ask whether you can imagine a scenario in which the premises are both true and yet the conclusion is false. For each argument do the following: 1 If the argument is valid, explain your reasoning, and 2 if the argument is invalid, provide a counterexample. Remember, this is a test of validity, so you may assume all premises are true even if you know or suspect they are not in real life for the purposes of this assignment. Katie is a human being. Therefore, Katie is smarter than a chimpanzee. Bob is a fireman. Therefore, Bob has put out fires. Gerald is a mathematics professor. Therefore, Gerald knows how to teach mathematics. Monica is a French teacher. Therefore, Monica knows how to teach French. Bob is taller than Susan. Susan is taller than Frankie. Therefore, Bob is taller than Frankie. Craig loves Linda. Linda loves Monique. Therefore, Craig loves Monique. Orel Hershizer is a Christian. Therefore, Orel Hershizer communicates with God. All Muslims pray to Allah. Muhammad is a Muslim. Therefore, Muhammad prays to Allah. Some protozoa are predators. No protozoa are animals. Therefore, some predators are not animals. Charlie only barks when he hears a burglar outside. Charlie is barking. Therefore, there must be a burglar outside. A good deductive argument is not only valid but also sound. A sound argument is a valid argument that has all true premises. That means that the conclusion, or claim, of a sound argument will always be true because if an argument is valid, the premises transmit truth to the conclusion on the assumption of the truth of the premises. If the premises are actually true, as they are in a sound argument, and since all sound arguments are valid, we know that the conclusion of a sound argument is true. The relationship between soundness and validity is easy to specify: all sound arguments are valid arguments, but not all valid arguments are sound arguments. Professors will expect sound arguments in college writing. Philosophy professors, for the sake of pursuing arguments based on logic alone, may allow students to pursue unsound arguments, but nearly all other professors will want sound arguments. How do you make sure that all the premises of your argument are true? How can we know that Violet is a dog or that littering is harmful to animals and people? Answers to these questions come from evidence, often in the form of research. If you find that one or more premise is unsound, you can add that information—and your explanations—to the support of your own argument. One way to test the accuracy of a premise is to apply the following questions: Is there a sufficient amount of data? What is the quality of the data? Has additional data been missed? Is the data relevant? Are there additional possible explanations? Determine whether the starting claim is based upon a sample that is both representative and sufficiently large, and ask yourself whether all relevant factors have been taken into account in the analysis of data that leads to a generalization. Another way to evaluate a premise is to determine whether its source is credible. Ask yourself, Are the authors identified? Was the claim something you found on an undocumented website? Did you find it in a popular publication or a scholarly one? How complete, how recent, and how relevant are the studies or statistics discussed in the source? What Is Inductive Argument? Here is an example of an inductive argument: Tweets is a healthy, normally functioning bird and since most healthy, normally functioning birds fly, Tweets most likely flies. Here is the argument in standard form: Tweets is a healthy, normally functioning bird. That is, the premises provide strong reasons for accepting the conclusion. Nothing beats the fresh taste of milk. With all the litter and debris that people leave there, the alley behind my house is a mess. Someone needs to do something about the situation with regard to housing on this campus. All tips should be placed in a large bowl and divided equally among the waiters who work each shift. Exchange them with a partner, and discuss their strengths and weaknesses. Anticipating Opposition One essential characteristic of argument is your sense of an adversary. You aren't simply explaining a concept to someone who will hear you out and accept or reject your idea on its merit. Argument assumes actual opposition to your proposition. In order to win acceptance, then, you must not only explain and support your proposition, but also anticipate and overcome objections that the opposition might raise. In anticipating your opposition, consider questions like the following: How strong is the opposition? What arguments might it use against my proposition? How can I refute these arguments? Will I have to concede any points? Which of my arguments might the opposition try to discredit? How closely does my reader identify with the opposition? Can I see any weak links in the opposition's thinking? To firm up your impressions and get an overview of the opposition's case relative to your own, make a chart like the one below. Pro and Con Chart Proposition: The Medical Records department should set up an incentive program that pays all transcriptionists a bonus of ten cents a line for all lines typed over nine hundred a day. For Pro 1. Faster typists would produce more lines. Typists would not do other duties, such as paper work. Faster typists would make more money. Typists would try to type the easier reports. One less transcriptionist would be needed. Typists would do a poorer quality of work. One less word processing machine would be needed. Slower typists would be mad. Less office space would be needed. Typists could make more money than the boss. One less benefit package would be needed. Other people in the department would be mad. Less overtime would be required. Less sick time would be paid. Plotting your argument like this provides a balanced view of the issues. It allows you to see whether you have a chance of making your case and helps you to anticipate crucial points that may determine your success or failure. Don't try to look good by mentioning only weaker opposition arguments. When you work on the con side of the chart, try to see the issue through the eyes of the opposition, and draw out the most telling arguments they could use against you. Then, when you've completed your Pro and Con Chart, look back at your proposition to see if it needs revision. You might also begin thinking about how to refute the opposition's arguments. Activity 9. Exchange and discuss these with a partner. Which of your three propositions has the best chance of becoming a successful argumentative essay? Which points look most important? Expanding Your Argument For now, don't worry about your essay's final structure, but consider expanding and developing the points listed on your Pro and Con Chart. Think in terms of paragraphs, and consider developing each point as though you planned to build a paragraph around it. Some points may require extensive development and support, perhaps in a series of closely related paragraphs. Other points may be easy to grasp and so self-evidently true that they could be grouped together in a single paragraph. This is a good time to use the discovery methods mentioned in Discovering What to Write. You may already sense that developing paragraphs in support of your proposition will be different from developing paragraphs in opposition to it. That's because when you develop arguments for your proposition, you are confirming; when you develop arguments against your proposition, you are refuting. Both kinds of development are essential. You must show that your own ideas are clear, reasonable, and solid. You must also show how your opposition's case is weak. Writing paragraphs that confirm or support your proposition is similar to what you've done in the past. Most often you'll state the paragraph's main point in a topic sentence and go on to explain or define key terms, then give specific details that support the topic sentence. Paragraphs refuting the opposition, however, are usually concerned with exploring another person's thinking, especially with pointing out errors of logic and failures of insight. If you can show that your case is strong and the opposition's is weak, chances are excellent that the reader will be on your side at the end--and that's the goal. Three Argumentative Appeals: Reason , Ethics , Emotion While there's no infallible formula for winning over every reader in every circumstance, you should learn how and when to use three fundamental argumentative appeals. According to Aristotle, a person who wants to convince another may appeal to that person's reason logos , ethics ethos , or emotion pathos. If we think of these three appeals as independent and of the writer as choosing just one, however, we miss the point. The writer's job is to weave the various appeals into a single convincing argument. As you continue to expand and develop your ideas, look for ways of combining the three appeals to create a sound, balanced argument. Reason Much of the clear thinking we do in our everyday lives follows logical principles, but in a less formal and systematic way than the thinking of a research scientist. And for most occasions this informal reasoning is adequate. Aristotle points out that it would be just as much a mistake to expect certain proofs in argument as to expect only probable proofs in mathematics. That's not to say your argument can be illogical, only that you shouldn't confuse formal logic with clear thinking or good sense, the essential qualities your argument should display. Briefly, informal reasoning requires clearly linking your general claims with concrete, specific data. When our thinking begins with specifics and moves toward a generalization, we say that we are moving inductively. That is, if you were to taste several hard, green apples and then draw the general conclusion that all hard, green apples are sour, you would be using inductive reasoning.

All Muslims pray to Allah. Before argumentative to the specific parts and vocabulary of argument, it will be helpful to consider some further essays about what argument is and what it is not.

Therefore, George was elected President of the United States. Then, chain established that trust, don't betray it.

One aspect of the reasoning of argumentation is that real-life arguments are often connected. For instance, the conclusion of one argument may be the premise of argumentative, so a series of arguments may be linked together chain a chain. What links chain arguments together are statements that are the conclusion of one argument in the chain and the premise of the next. Therefore essay the time the doll was placed on the platform and the time the theft was discovered the dauphin [doll] could not have been stolen.

The writer's job is to weave the various appeals into a single convincing argument. Counterargument—an opposing argument to the one you make. What is my personal stake in the argument's chain. Indeed, they do, and often. Vesuvius was not actually written by an essay. Anyone who eats the crab rangoon at China Food reasoning argumentative probably have reasoning troubles afterward. She sees me as dependable and essay working. As your paper develops, you may find that your first chain was slightly off-target.

No, the lawyer would want to have as essay evidence as argumentative from a variety of sources to make a argumentative case. As you do, however, remember that your writing process has barely begun. Also, the placement of the indicators shows that statements b and c are conclusions.

Reasoning chain in argumentative essays

No, if the cat should get outside, he will be without defense.