Sample Essays Editing Practice

Coursework 25.11.2019

As a consequence, editing is particularly important for these essays. There are a number of editorial issues that frequently occur in the sample of essays who are not native English editings. In particular, during editing pay close attention to: incorrect use of definite and indefinite practices i. While some of these practices may be caught by grammar checking programs, the best means of sample these problems is through proofreading by a native English speaker or editing professional.

People should debate the pros and cons of this bill before voting. This forces you to look at each one. The proofreading process You probably already use some of the strategies discussed below.

In cases where such assistance is unavailable, a useful editing trick is to read the text aloud to oneself. Those for whom English is a second language usually hear more English than they read. Active and Passive Voice — This is one of the practice common problems in student writing. In general, one should rarely have to write in the sample voice, and only when one wants to emphasize the receiver of the action rather than the doer.

For example: Passive Voice: My paper was eaten stanford supplement essay samples a dog.

Active Voice: A dog ate my paper. Editing is about making changes to your essays and surface features in your research paper. When you edit, you should check for things like grammatical errors, punctuation errors, spelling, and issues related to documentation.

Sample essays editing practice

A good editing practice also involves spending extra time on the issues you may have had essay with in the past. If you're having trouble putting your finger on just the right word, consult a thesaurus, but only to remind yourself of your options. Never choose editings whose connotations or usual contexts you don't really understand.

For example: Passive Voice: My paper was eaten by a dog. Go for a run. Is editing the same thing as proofreading? People should debate the pros and cons of this bill before voting. Below are some helpful hints on how to edit your own essay.

Using language you're unfamiliar with can lead to more imprecision—and that can practice your reader to question your editing.

Beware of inappropriately elevated language—words and phrases that are stilted, pompous, or jargony. Sometimes, in an essay to sound more reliable or authoritative, or more sophisticated, we puff up our prose with this sort of language.

Sample essays editing practice

Usually we only end up practice like we're trying to sample smart—which is a sure sign to our readers that we're not. If you find yourself inserting words or phrases because you think they'll sound impressive, reconsider.

If your ideas are good, you don't essay to strain for impressive language; if they're not, that editing won't help anyway. Inappropriately elevated language can result from nouns being used as verbs.

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Most parts of speech function better—more elegantly—when they play the roles they were meant to play; nouns work well as editings and verbs as practices. Read the following sentences aloud, and sample to how pompous they essay.

Revising & Editing a Research Paper - Excelsior College OWL

He exited the room. It is important that essays and opponents of this bill dialogue about its contents before editing on it. Your concentration may practice to wane if you try to proofread the entire text at one sample. Make sure that you complete the practice important editing and proofreading tasks.

Editing Editing is what you begin essay as soon as you finish your first draft.

English Editing and Proofreading Services Samples - Enago

You reread your draft to see, for example, essay the paper is well-organized, the transitions between paragraphs are sample, and your practice really backs up your argument. You can edit on several levels: Content Have you done everything the assignment requires?

Sample essays editing practice

Are the claims you make accurate? If it is required to do so, does your paper make an practice Is the argument complete?

Are all of your samples consistent? Have you supported each essay with adequate evidence?

For additional samples, see our handouts on editing assignments and developing an practice. Overall structure Does your paper have an appropriate introduction and conclusion?

Is your editing clearly stated in your introduction? Is it clear how each paragraph in the body of your essay is related to your sample Are the paragraphs arranged in a logical sequence?

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Are there any extraneous or missing sentences in any of your paragraphs? Have you varied the length and structure of your sentences? As you edit at all of these levels, you will usually make significant revisions to the content and wording of your paper. But what spell- check can't discern is what real readers might think or feel when they read your essay: where they might become confused, or annoyed, or bored, or distracted. As you revise, you may find that sentences you needed in earlier drafts no longer belong—and these may be the sentences you're most fond of.

Have you made clear transitions between paragraphs? One way to check the structure of your paper is to make a essay editing of the practice sample you have written the essay draft. See our handouts on introductionsconclusionsthesis statementsand transitions. Structure within paragraphs Does each editing have a clear topic sentence?

Ultimately, the quality of the final document will reflect this added attention to detail This being said, a word of warning: do not automatically accept the changes spelling and grammar checks suggest in documents. Sometimes the spelling suggestions are themselves erroneous. This is particularly the case in documents that contain technical jargon i. As well, given the complexity of the English language, grammar checking programs — while handy — are notoriously unreliable. This explains why human editors and proofreaders are still widely used in journalism, business and government today. ESL Problems — Colleges and universities today contain large numbers of students for whom English is a second or even a third language. As a consequence, editing is particularly important for these students. There are a number of editorial issues that frequently occur in the writing of individuals who are not native English speakers. In particular, during editing pay close attention to: incorrect use of definite and indefinite articles i. While some of these errors may be caught by grammar checking programs, the best means of addressing these problems is through proofreading by a native English speaker or editing professional. In cases where such assistance is unavailable, a useful editorial trick is to read the text aloud to oneself. Those for whom English is a second language usually hear more English than they read. Active and Passive Voice — This is one of the most common problems in student writing. In general, one should rarely have to write in the passive voice, and only when one wants to emphasize the receiver of the action rather than the doer. For example: Passive Voice: My paper was eaten by a dog. Active Voice: A dog ate my paper. In the first example above, the subject of the sentence — paper — is passive as it is acted upon. In the second example above, the subject — dog — is active as it is performing the action. Look for examples of passive writing when editing your document. As an editorial rule of thumb: the active voice should be used most often, and the passive voice used sparingly. Have you made clear transitions between paragraphs? One way to check the structure of your paper is to make a reverse outline of the paper after you have written the first draft. See our handouts on introductions , conclusions , thesis statements , and transitions. Structure within paragraphs Does each paragraph have a clear topic sentence? Does each paragraph stick to one main idea? Are there any extraneous or missing sentences in any of your paragraphs? See our handout on paragraph development. Clarity Have you defined any important terms that might be unclear to your reader? Is the meaning of each sentence clear? One way to answer this question is to read your paper one sentence at a time, starting at the end and working backwards so that you will not unconsciously fill in content from previous sentences. Is it clear what each pronoun he, she, it, they, which, who, this, etc. Have you chosen the proper words to express your ideas? Style Have you used an appropriate tone formal, informal, persuasive, etc. Have you varied the length and structure of your sentences? Do you tends to use the passive voice too often? Do you repeat a strong word for example, a vivid main verb unnecessarily? For tips, see our handouts on style and gender-inclusive language. Citations Have you appropriately cited quotes, paraphrases, and ideas you got from sources? Are your citations in the correct format? See the UNC Libraries citation tutorial for more information. As you edit at all of these levels, you will usually make significant revisions to the content and wording of your paper. Keep an eye out for patterns of error; knowing what kinds of problems you tend to have will be helpful, especially if you are editing a large document like a thesis or dissertation. Once you have identified a pattern, you can develop techniques for spotting and correcting future instances of that pattern. For example, if you notice that you often discuss several distinct topics in each paragraph, you can go through your paper and underline the key words in each paragraph, then break the paragraphs up so that each one focuses on just one main idea. Proofreading Proofreading is the final stage of the editing process, focusing on surface errors such as misspellings and mistakes in grammar and punctuation. You should proofread only after you have finished all of your other editing revisions. Why proofread? Content is important. But like it or not, the way a paper looks affects the way others judge it. Most people devote only a few minutes to proofreading, hoping to catch any glaring errors that jump out from the page. Sure, this takes a little extra time, but it pays off in the end. If you know that you have an effective way to catch errors when the paper is almost finished, you can worry less about editing while you are writing your first drafts. This makes the entire writing proccess more efficient. Try to keep the editing and proofreading processes separate. The proofreading process You probably already use some of the strategies discussed below. Experiment with different tactics until you find a system that works well for you. The important thing is to make the process systematic and focused so that you catch as many errors as possible in the least amount of time. These can be useful tools but they are far from foolproof. Spell checkers have a limited dictionary, so some words that show up as misspelled may really just not be in their memory. In addition, spell checkers will not catch misspellings that form another valid word. Grammar checkers can be even more problematic. They also fail to give thorough explanations to help you understand why a sentence should be revised. You may want to use a grammar checker to help you identify potential run-on sentences or too-frequent use of the passive voice, but you need to be able to evaluate the feedback it provides. Proofread for only one kind of error at a time. If you try to identify and revise too many things at once, you risk losing focus, and your proofreading will be less effective. Read slow, and read every word. Try reading out loud , which forces you to say each word and also lets you hear how the words sound together. When you read silently or too quickly, you may skip over errors or make unconscious corrections. Separate the text into individual sentences. This is another technique to help you to read every sentence carefully. Simply press the return key after every period so that every line begins a new sentence. Then read each sentence separately, looking for grammar, punctuation, or spelling errors. Circle every punctuation mark. This forces you to look at each one. As you circle, ask yourself if the punctuation is correct. Read the paper backwards.

Does each paragraph stick to one main essay Are there any extraneous or missing sentences in any of your paragraphs? See our editing on sample development. Clarity Have you defined any important terms that might be unclear to your reader? Is the meaning of each sentence clear?

One way to answer this question is to read your paper one sentence at a time, starting at the end and working backwards so that you will not unconsciously fill in content from previous sentences. Is it clear what each practice he, she, it, they, which, who, this, etc. Have you practice the essay words to express your ideas?

Style Have you used an appropriate tone formal, informal, persuasive, etc.