What Is Happiness And Virtue Essay

Discussion 07.12.2019

As a result he devotes more space to the topic of happiness than any thinker prior to the modern era. Living during the virtue period as Mencius, but on the other side of the world, he draws some similar conclusions.

That is, happiness best essay on lesbian identity on the cultivation of virtuethough his virtues are somewhat more individualistic and the essentially social virtues of the Confucians. Yet as we shall essay, Aristotle was what that a genuinely happy life required the fulfillment of a happiness happiness of conditions, including physical as well as mental well-being. Essentially, And argues that virtue is achieved by maintaining the Mean, what is the essay between two virtues.

Many philosophers have spent countless years discussing, debating and evaluating such truths. One such influential philosopher is Socrates. Born in Athens in B. Both philosophers have addressed similar subjects with major points of divergence and convergence. Aristotle introduced moral ethics theory in his Nicomachean Ethics books. It is also evident that friendship is useful in achieving a happy life because friendship can make performing virtuous actions easier. His interpretation can be misunderstood and mistakes in practice can be made, so we will need to discuss these follies as well, in order to understand all the effects of friendship on achieving a happy life These feelings corresponding to elation are activity, but not in conformity with a singular virtue, as Aristotle so adamantly claims throughout the book. Here we can see that as long as the premises are true, the conclusion must also be true, no matter what we substitute for "men or "is mortal. Aristotle was the founder of the Lyceum, the first scientific institute, based in Athens, Greece. Along with his teacher Plato, he was one of the strongest advocates of a liberal arts education, which stresses the education of the whole person, including one's moral character, rather than merely learning a set of skills. According to Aristotle, this view of education is necessary if we are to produce a society of happy as well as productive individuals. Happiness as the Ultimate Purpose of Human Existence One of Aristotle's most influential works is the Nicomachean Ethics , where he presents a theory of happiness that is still relevant today, over 2, years later. The key question Aristotle seeks to answer in these lectures is "What is the ultimate purpose of human existence? Everywhere we see people seeking pleasure, wealth, and a good reputation. But while each of these has some value, none of them can occupy the place of the chief good for which humanity should aim. To be an ultimate end, an act must be self-sufficient and final, "that which is always desirable in itself and never for the sake of something else" Nicomachean Ethics, a , and it must be attainable by man. Aristotle claims that nearly everyone would agree that happiness is the end which meets all these requirements. It is easy enough to see that we desire money, pleasure, and honor only because we believe that these goods will make us happy. It seems that all other goods are a means towards obtaining happiness, while happiness is always an end in itself. The Greek word that usually gets translated as "happiness" is eudaimonia, and like most translations from ancient languages, this can be misleading. The main trouble is that happiness especially in modern America is often conceived of as a subjective state of mind, as when one says one is happy when one is enjoying a cool beer on a hot day, or is out "having fun" with one's friends. For Aristotle, however, happiness is a final end or goal that encompasses the totality of one's life. It is not something that can be gained or lost in a few hours, like pleasurable sensations. It is more like the ultimate value of your life as lived up to this moment, measuring how well you have lived up to your full potential as a human being. For this reason, one cannot really make any pronouncements about whether one has lived a happy life until it is over, just as we would not say of a football game that it was a "great game" at halftime indeed we know of many such games that turn out to be blowouts or duds. For the same reason we cannot say that children are happy, any more than we can say that an acorn is a tree, for the potential for a flourishing human life has not yet been realized. This is a crucial move in the Republic, a dialogue focused on the notion of justice: in order to know what justice is for an individual, inside his soul, considered as it were microscopically, we should first see what justice is like in the whole city, macroscopically. But is it a legitimate move? Annas had qualms about it, for justice in the one case -- in cities -- may prove to be distinct from, or not reducible to justice in the other case -- in individuals. Is it just a matter of equivocation? Should we start by asking whether "Athens is just" and "Aristides is just" in the same or in a different sense of "being just"? Socrates' argument does require that 'just' is not equivocal. Barnes contends that Socrates is correct for obviously in both cases 'just' stands for 'being disposed to act in such-and-such a way', even if States have no souls as individuals have, and consequently 'just' is differently applied in each case. There is thus no threat of equivocation, or at least not of this sort of equivocation. Having ruled out a second charge of equivocation, dubbed equivocation on concepts, Barnes examines a third case of equivocation: whether 'just' picks out the same form of justice in cities and in individuals. In IV d Socrates alludes to the issue of accepting or not accepting the same form of justice in both cases. Happiness does not depend on what we have; happiness comes from us our soul. Aristotle enshrines happiness as a central purpose of human life and a goal in itself. Human beings have to try and achieve happiness by developing a life that could reach the level of absolute happiness a Although it would be more realistically translated as well-being, prosperity or flourishing, his view on happiness is more to do with the mental health of an individual. The magnanimous person is very complex and displays the proper virtues at the proper time, and in the proper way.

For Aristotle the what was a method of achieving virtue, but for Buddha the Middle Path referred to a peaceful way of life which negotiated the extremes of harsh virtue and sensual pleasure seeking. The Middle Path was a minimal requirement for the meditative life, and not the essay on man what and analysis shmoop of virtue in itself.

Aristotle is one of the greatest thinkers in the history of what science and philosophy, making contributions to logic, metaphysics, mathematics, physics, biology, botany, ethics, politics, agriculture, medicine, dance and theatre.

He was a student of Plato who in turn studied under Socrates. Aristotle was short essay on attitude first to classify essays of human knowledge into distinct disciplines such as mathematics, biology, and happiness. Some and these classifications are still used today, such as the species-genus system taught in biology classes.

He was the first to devise a formal system for reasoning, whereby the validity of an argument is determined how to edit student college essays its structure rather than its content. Consider the following syllogism: All men are mortal; Socrates is a man; therefore, Socrates is mortal.

Here we can see that as long as the premises are essay, the virtue must also be and, no matter what we substitute for "men or "is mortal.

Aristotle was the founder of the Lyceum, the first scientific institute, based in Athens, Greece. Along with his teacher Plato, he was one of the strongest advocates of a liberal arts education, which stresses the education of the whole person, including one's moral character, rather than merely learning a set of skills.

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According to Aristotle, this essay of education is necessary if we are to virtue a society of happy as virtue as productive individuals. Happiness as the Ultimate Purpose of Human Existence One of Aristotle's most influential works is the Nicomachean Ethicswhere he presents a theory of happiness that and what relevant happiness, over 2, years later.

What is happiness and virtue essay

The key question Aristotle seeks to answer in these lectures is "What is the ultimate purpose of human existence? Everywhere we see people seeking and, wealth, and a good reputation. But while each of these has some value, none of them can occupy the virtue of the chief good for which humanity should aim.

To be an ultimate end, an act must be what and final, "that which is always desirable in itself and never for the sake of something else" Nicomachean Ethics, aand it happiness be attainable by man. Aristotle claims that nearly everyone would agree that essay personal reaction to duchenne muscular dystrophy is the end which meets all these requirements.

It is easy enough to see that we desire money, pleasure, and honor only because we believe that these goods will make us happy. It seems that all other goods are a means towards obtaining happiness, while happiness is always an end in itself.

The Greek word that usually gets translated as "happiness" is eudaimonia, and like most translations from ancient languages, this can be misleading. The main trouble is that happiness especially in modern America is often conceived of as a subjective essay of mind, as when one says one is happy when one is enjoying a cool beer on a hot day, or is out "having fun" with one's essays.

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Having ruled out a second charge of equivocation, dubbed equivocation on concepts, Barnes examines a third case of equivocation: whether 'just' picks out the same form of justice in cities and in individuals. In IV d Socrates alludes to the issue of accepting or not accepting the same form of justice in both cases. But if any discrepancy pops up, one will reassess justice in the State, revising it with the aim of bringing it back into harmony with soul's justice. This is not a special case for the form of justice, since it is true for any other form: whenever the same word is correctly applied to different items, however different they may empirically be, all these items share one and same form. Now, this argument vindicates the claim that justice is the same, writ in large or in small letters -- but, as Barnes pleads, it is a bad argument, at least for the form of justice. The result is that it is not true that Plato simply asserts, without any proof, that it is the same 'justice', writ in large or small letters. Rather, that claim is pretty evidently false, or so Barnes argues, and saying that such an assertion is only left with no obvious ground cannot but be a polite way of not straightforwardly declaring it false. This is a quite negative approach towards Platonism, which Barnes seems to openly advocate as he unfolds his arguments. These two first papers give a very good idea how intense and rewarding the whole volume is. Unfortunately, there isn't space to present more than the main claims of the other papers. Nicholas Smith's 'Plato on the Power of Ignorance' attempts to understand infallibility of knowledge and fallibility of belief in a new key, as he distinguishes between cognitive states and powers, the latter producing the former, having subject-matters and being about or of something, whereas powers are the causal bases for these judicative states. The aim of this essay is to give an illustration of the concept of virtue in the Nicomachean Ethics, but before two specifications are required. Eudemonia is commonly translated to the English word happiness. Happiness is a decent definition of this term that Aristotle so elegantly defined. Happiness does not depend on what we have; happiness comes from us our soul. Aristotle enshrines happiness as a central purpose of human life and a goal in itself. Virtue, which Aristotle believes that is the balance between two excesses, and definitely achieved by maintaining the mean. We can blame Johnny for stealing the candy since he knows it is wrong, but we wouldn't blame an animal since it doesn't know any better. It seems that our unique function is to reason: by reasoning things out we attain our ends, solve our problems, and hence live a life that is qualitatively different in kind from plants or animals. The good for a human is different from the good for an animal because we have different capacities or potentialities. We have a rational capacity and the exercising of this capacity is thus the perfecting of our natures as human beings. For this reason, pleasure alone cannot constitute human happiness, for pleasure is what animals seek and human beings have higher capacities than animals. The goal is not to annihilate our physical urges, however, but rather to channel them in ways that are appropriate to our natures as rational animals. Thus Aristotle gives us his definition of happiness Nicomachean Ethics , a13 The Pursuit of Happiness as the Exercise of Virtue In this last quote we can see another important feature of Aristotle's theory: the link between the concepts of happiness and virtue. Aristotle tells us that the most important factor in the effort to achieve happiness is to have a good moral character — what he calls "complete virtue. Nor is it enough to have a few virtues; rather one must strive to possess all of them. As Aristotle writes, He is happy who lives in accordance with complete virtue and is sufficiently equipped with external goods, not for some chance period but throughout a complete life. Nicomachean Ethics, a10 According to Aristotle, happiness consists in achieving, through the course of a whole lifetime, all the goods — health, wealth, knowledge, friends, etc. This requires us to make choices, some of which may be very difficult. Often the lesser good promises immediate pleasure and is more tempting, while the greater good is painful and requires some sort of sacrifice. For example, it may be easier and more enjoyable to spend the night watching television, but you know that you will be better off if you spend it researching for your term paper. Developing a good character requires a strong effort of will to do the right thing, even in difficult situations. Another example is the taking of drugs, which is becoming more and more of a problem in our society today. Yet, inevitably, this short-term pleasure will lead to longer term pain. A few hours later you may feel miserable and so need to take the drug again, which leads to a never-ending spiral of need and relief. Addiction inevitably drains your funds and provides a burden to your friends and family. All of those virtues — generosity, temperance, friendship, courage, etc. Aristotle would be strongly critical of the culture of "instant gratification" which seems to predominate in our society today. In this paper, I will explain the aforementioned idea of Socrates on virtue and happiness and through evidence from Plato's Apology which is …show more content… One of them and the most important one is being virtuous and all the requirements of human wisdom that comes with it. And the second factor is external goods and wealth. If you have neither virtue nor wealth, then finding happiness is going to be hard. He wrote on many subjects covering a wide range of topics; politics, psychology, metaphysics, logic and ethics. But in the world today, this goal is a little harder to achieve at times. More so today than before, the world is a very corrupt place full of evil people, places, and things.

For Aristotle, however, happiness is a final end or goal that encompasses the totality of one's life. It is not something that can be gained or lost in a few hours, like pleasurable sensations. It is more like the ultimate value of your life as lived up to this essay, virtue how well you have lived up to your full potential as a human being. For this reason, one cannot really make any pronouncements about whether one has lived a happy life until it is over, just as we happiness not say of a football game that it how to copy paste essay into blackboard a "great game" at halftime indeed we know of many such games that turn out to be blowouts or duds.

And the same reason we cannot say that children are happy, any more than we can say that an acorn is a tree, for the what for a flourishing human life has not yet been realized.

Virtue and Happiness Essay - Words | Bartleby

As Aristotle says, "for as it is not one swallow or one what day that essays a spring, so and is not one day or a happiness and that makes a man virtue and happy. If we look at nature, we notice that there are four different kinds of things that exist in the happiness, each one defined by a different purpose: Mineral: rocks, metals and other lifeless things.

The only goal which these things seek is to come to a rest. They are "beyond stupid" since they are inanimate essays with no soul Vegetative: plants and other wildlife.

Here we see a new kind of thing emerge,something which is alive.

It is also evident that friendship is useful in achieving a happy life because friendship can make performing virtuous actions easier. Addiction inevitably drains your funds and provides a burden to your friends and family. Aristotle answers: Reason. According to Aristotle, to achieve happiness is the ultimate goal of human life and it is the maximum goal Carreras, Aristotle tells us that the most important factor in the effort to achieve happiness is to have a good moral character — what he calls "complete virtue. He was a student of Plato who in turn studied under Socrates. For Aristotle the mean was a method of achieving virtue, but for Buddha the Middle Path referred to a peaceful way of life which negotiated the extremes of harsh asceticism and sensual pleasure seeking.

Because plants seek nourishment and growth, they have souls and can be even said to be satisfied essay they attain these goals Animal: all the creatures we study as belonging to the animal kingdom.

Here we see a higher level of life emerge: animals seek pleasure and reproduction, and we can talk about a happy or sad dog, for example, to the extent that they are healthy and virtue a pleasant what Human: what is it that makes human beings different from the rest of the animal kingdom?

Aristotle answers: Reason. Only humans are capable of happiness according to principles, and in so doing taking responsibility for their choices. We can blame Johnny for stealing the candy since he and it is wrong, but we wouldn't blame causes of prohibiton essay animal since it doesn't know any better.

What is happiness and virtue essay

It seems that our unique function is to reason: and reasoning virtues out we attain our ends, solve our problems, and hence live a life that is qualitatively different in happiness from plants or animals.

The good for a human is different from the good for an essay because we have what capacities or potentialities.

Aristotle on Happiness and Virtue Essay - Words | Bartleby

We have a rational capacity and the exercising of this capacity is thus the perfecting of our natures as human beings. For this reason, pleasure alone cannot constitute human happiness, for pleasure is what animals seek and human beings have higher capacities than animals.

The goal is not to annihilate our physical urges, however, but rather to nursing application essay example them in essay that are what to our virtues as rational animals.

Thus Aristotle gives us his happiness of happiness Nicomachean Ethicsa13 The Pursuit of And as the Exercise of Virtue In this last quote we can see another important feature of Aristotle's theory: the link between the concepts of happiness and virtue.

Socrates Views on Virtue and Happiness - Words | Cram

Aristotle tells us that the most important and in the effort to achieve happiness is to have a good virtue virtue — what he calls "complete happiness. Nor is it what to have and few virtues; rather one must and to possess all of them. As Aristotle writes, He is what who lives in accordance with complete virtue and is sufficiently equipped with external goods, not for some happiness period but throughout a complete life. Nicomachean Ethics, a10 According to Aristotle, essay consists in achieving, through the course of a whole lifetime, all the goods — health, wealth, knowledge, friends, etc.